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will cannabis produce seeds

Remember, only the bud sites that come into contact with pollen will develop cannabis seeds. You can choose to apply pollen to parts or all of your female plant. You’ll also want to make sure you directly touch the pistils/hairs on a bud site to ensure the area is well pollinated.

Cannabis pollen is no different from regular pollen produced by other plants.

Collecting pollen is relatively simple. You’ll know your male plants are ready when their pollen sacks look full or when you find small patches of pollen on nearby leafs.

HOW TO STORE CANNABIS POLLEN

Pollen is usually collected by expert breeders and used to make cannabis seeds or breed unique strains. It can be manually extracted from flowering male plants and stored for well over a year.

4 weeks after pollinating your female you can begin checking in on your seeds to see if they’re ready for harvest. Simply pick a seed out from a pollinated bud; mature seeds will have an incredibly hard shell and be a dark brown or tan colour. They might also have some light striping on the outer shell.

Pollen is used to fertilize female cannabis plants and create seeds. In the wild, cannabis pollen is transported from male plants to females via the wind. However, in a manmade grow op growers will collect the pollen from males manually and then apply it to the females when they’ve started developing flowers.

If your cannabis seeds don’t meet this description, let your plant develop a little longer. Some cannabis plants can develop mature seeds really late into their flowering cycle. If that’s the case, make sure you keep your plant alive with plenty of light and nutrients.

In some cases, even if a seed isn’t completely mature, there’s still a chance it could be viable. But often these are extremely weak, take long to develop, and express other unfavorable characteristics. Growers usually discard weak plants to free up space.

With cloning, you don’t have to get new seeds every time you want to grow another plant—you just take a cutting of the old plant—and you don’t have to germinate seeds or sex them out and get rid of the males.

But if the seed you found looks decent, you might as well germinate it and see what sprouts.

Are you ready to grow?

If you don’t like the flavor, effects, or even the look of the bud, then it’s probably not worth growing.

For a seed to be viable, it must be mature enough to have a completely formed genetic blueprint, and it must be strong enough to germinate and pop through its hard casing and sprout its crucial taproot.

A lot of classic weed strains that have been around for a while come in feminized form. Some popular fem seeds are:

These are referred to as “bagseeds” and whether or not you can grow one will depend on where it came from.

Spotting male cannabis plants and pollinated females early can save you from investing further time and effort into an entire growing season that will be for naught. Most of the time, the best course of action is to get rid of the males along with your pollinated ladies and just start a new grow.

There is a good reason why most growers keep male plants away from their ladies: Pollination from males causes the females to develop seeds. As a result, females focus their energy on seed production, rather than on growing you some fine-quality bud. This seedy and unfortunate final product can be avoided by implementing a few basic techniques.

Male plants won’t show hairs at these nodes, but will develop little sacs of pollen. These pollen sacs will look like little balls. These balls can appear on their own or in clusters, depending how far into the pre-flowering stage the plant is. At some later stage of growth, the pollen sacs will burst open, spilling the pollen and possibly pollinating your females.

WHAT TO DO WHEN YOUR FEMALES GET POLLINATED?

The typical cannabis grower normally doesn’t have a reason to keep males, and will want to get rid of them as soon as they are spotted. Cannabis breeders, on the other hand, may want to keep males along with their crop of female plants. In such cases, the breeder will normally separate the sexes to avoid any accidental pollination. They may grow females in one tent and males in another. When grown outdoors, such as in a garden, the males are often kept in the most remote corner of their growing area, as far from the females as possible. Even then, because of the wind carrying around the pollen, there is always some risk of accidental pollination.

To determine the sex of your cannabis plants, you will have to wait until the pre-flowering stage when plants begin to put their energy into reproduction. Female cannabis plants show their gender signs later than males. At the location where they will soon grow their buds (the nodes between the stalk and the stem), females will show wispy white hairs.

Obviously, no one wants to smoke seedy weed. When you grow cannabis and learn how to identify male plants and signs of pollination, you can remove these plants to save your remaining females. Likewise, recognising a pollinated female early allows you to start again before it’s too late, rather than finishing a grow that will only result in a poor-quality harvest.

Pollination requires the presence of males or intersex (hermaphrodite) plants, which are females that will also produce pollen. The first thing you want to do to keep the risk of pollination low is to remove as many males or “hermies” as as you can. Especially during the first three weeks of flowering, it’s important to frequently check for possible male specimens in your garden.