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when do cannabis seeds turn brown

When planting directly into the soil, don’t bury your seeds too deep. If they’re too far down, they won’t have access to enough oxygen, and moisture in the soil can overpower them and cause them to rot.

Among other critters, ants are particularly keen on eating the taproots from sprouted seeds. To keep your seeds safe, use bird netting, ant traps, and other preventative measures like neem oil or slug traps. Check on your seeds often so you can spot infestations and act before they become a problem.

4. SEEDS BURIED TOO SHALLOW OR TOO DEEP

Solution: Only plant your seeds in a sterilised (i.e. new) potting mix as this won’t contain these harmful organisms. But your substrate isn’t the only thing you need to keep an eye on. You’ll also need to make sure your containers are clean, as these can also carry mould and other harmful pathogens. If you encounter fungus problems when you’re germinating, it is best to get rid of the seed and the contaminated growing medium and start over.

Excessively high temperatures in your germination environment can lead to slow and stunted growth, and it can cause your soil to dry out. The optimal temperature for seed germination is a moderate 20–25°C.

Do your due diligence and verify when local temperatures are high enough to set your plants outside. Usually, waiting a couple weeks for higher spring temperatures is worth it!

You need to know the signs that indicate your plants are ripe enough to be harvested. Look out for long white threads (the flowering hairs) that come out of the flowers.

The aforementioned advice is a good guideline but you should be aware that with some strains, it can be much more tricky to work out if the plant is ripe to be harvested. Different strains of marijuana can present in different ways when they are ready for harvest. Some varieties, for example, manage to retain most of their hairs white even when they’re more than ready to be picked.

1. The Pistil Method

After harvesting, you have a whole mountain with leaves and clippings. However, many of these residues can still be used for processing in recipes or tea. You can also compost any unwanted vegetation.

Cannabis, weed, pot, herb – the list of names for the wonderful plant is endless, but, as you can see, the knowledge of when to harvest, while not completely straightforward, is, nevertheless, less complex than it might first appear.

Now comes the technical part; what to look for when looking through your microscope or jewellers loupe: