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planting multople cannabis seeds in one pot

Before you’re transplanting your cannabis to their final container, you should be germinating them.

This makes the fight for root space meaningless.

Since you won’t have to worry about separating the plants, this could work.

Exceptions to the Rule: Breeding

In a planter your space is already limited, and placing more than one plant in a pot can stunt both plants growth. Another problem you’ll run into is sexing.

Germinating is done one seed at a time, so if you’re wanting to plant more than one seed thinking that some won’t take, don’t.

Another cheap alternative is 5-gallon paint buckets—that have never had paint in them of course. So, unless you plan on breeding two plants, stick with just one seed per pot.

They are a lot more cost effective compared to clay or plastic pots.

If you use more than one or many cannabis seeds in a pot, the cannabis plants will begin to compete against each other for nutrients, so the smallest cannabis plants (which sometimes may be the best phenotypes.) will get wiped out by the bigger cannabis plants.

If you have ever wondered how many cannabis seeds per pot, look no further. One seed is all it takes to grow one plant so even if you see plants that look like as if they were bushes it is all just one seed. Regardless of the apparent size of the plant, all growers know that only one cannabis seeds per pot is required.

If you are growing from regular cannabis seeds they could also cross-pollinate resulting in buds with cannabis seeds in them. It sounds simple enough but if the buds have seeds inside them, the potency of the strain can be reduced up to 30%. Each cannabis seed is a plant and they need their own space to grow and thrive, as well as to produce bigger and better buds. Remember that more than one cannabis seed per pot is too many.

So you know how many cannabis seeds per pot, but you want to know what will happen anyway?

You might find our FAQ Submission How Many Marijuana Seeds To Grow A Plant? useful!