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plant cannabis seeds june

Seed germination length: 3-10 days

Vegetative stage length: 3-16 weeks

Notes on marijuana growth phases

The biggest variability in how long a marijuana plant takes to grow will happen in the vegetative stage—after the seedling phase and before flowering.

The vegetative stage of cannabis is where the plant’s growth truly takes off. At this point, you’ve transplanted your plant into a larger pot and the roots and foliage are developing rapidly. This is also the time to begin topping or training your plants.

Even if growing outdoors, a lot of growers will start their seeds inside under an artificial light to help them through this delicate stage of marijuana growth.

The moment to germinate your seeds varies depending on the region. Depending on where you live, we’re not talking about the same weather conditions and therefore the date will also change. Although you can find a lot of information that claims to provide an appropriate date, our advice is that you don’t take it as something academic, observe the weather and make sure it really is good. In any case, here are some ballpark dates that you can use as a guide:

Look to see if the farmers near you are starting to fill their fields with seedlings of summer vegetables. In general, they’ve spent their whole lives growing crops and are experts in observing and understanding meteorological signs, so when you see them at work on their peppers and tomatoes, that’s the sign, the time has come. If you don’t know anyone with crops, you can always go to the nearest garden centre.

If you are starting to cultivate and your knowledge on marijuana in particular and botanics in general is scarce, here’s a trick: ask and observe. The same rules that apply to the cannabis plant’s germination also work when growing vegetables in general. So, when you see your neighbour sowing his crops, start germinating your seeds.

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In the case of autoflowering varieties, if you plant them too early you might pay for the mistake dearly. The life cycle of these varieties is very short and a bad start can have terrible consequences. As they only live for two and a half months, if the weather is bad during the first two weeks the plant will get blocked, and when the sun arrives and it’s capable of restoring its vigour, it will be too late.

Every season is different, it can come earlier or later. For example, as we mentioned above, in the Mediterranean climate, in general, the best time to germinate is in late April or early May. But you can find that, depending on the year, it’s hot earlier than that or it may be the opposite, it might be cold at the beginning and summer extends into the months of September and October. You must pay close attention to these types of variations to be able to adapt the cycle of your crop, postponing it or bringing it forward.

In both cases, with both automatic and regular or feminised seeds, we advise that you avoid the mistake of sowing too early. The difference between them is the life cycle; in the case of regular or feminised seeds, as they have more time for vegetative development, that is, a longer growth period (approximately 3 months), there is a greater margin for recovery and that initial error is not as serious.

It was all a dream, an illusion; during the spring season the weather can often turn ugly, and one week later it’s pouring rain. Your plants, which have barely taken their first steps, are in a totally drenched substrate, the few roots they had managed to develop are submerged in water, the leaves don’t grow and the plant is blocked. In the case of autoflowering varieties, by the time the plant recovers its vigour, it’s too late, as their growth period only lasts a month (they start to flower starting on the 25th-28th day approximately) and the final result will be a disaster. In the best case scenario, you’ll have a very small plant that will yield very little and of poor quality. In the worst case scenario, it will die.