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Lastly, Compound Genetics recommends its latest collaboration with Colorado seed gods Cannarado. Look for Gastro Pop—that’s Apples and Bananas to Grape Gasoline.

Growing can sound intimidating. So-called “autos” and “fem” seeds take the stress out of the learning curve. These two seed types are on track to upend regular seeds’ primacy.

“Seeds are selling really well,” said Brian Smith, inventory manager at Satori Wellness, Humboldt County, CA’s leading genetics retailer. “It’s the peak of the [seed] season pretty much from January 1 through April. Come on down, because, yes, they are moving.”

Purples, Zkittlez, and Runtz

Mission accomplished: Knight’s Templar OG from Dark Heart Nursery. (Courtesy Dark Heart Nursery)

Then strap in for a psychedelic rocket launch—Saturn Citrus is Super Lemon Haze crossed to Equilibrium’s African Orange.

“The Sour Apple is, I would say, our most beautiful autoflower that will really do well in any circumstance,” said Pennington.

See also: Savage Genetics’ Cheetoz (Cheetah Piss x Runtz); I Love Growing Marijuana’s Purple mixpack; Wave Rider’s cross of Wedding Cake Zkittlez x Modified Grapes.

A tropical monsoon climate is characterized by distinct wet and dry seasons, brought on by the movement of monsoon winds. There is little variation in temperature, and generally these places are hot year round.

Maritime temperate, or oceanic, climates are damp, with year-round rainfall. The temperatures are moderated by the ocean, with typically warm summers and cool winters, with neither season showing an extreme of heat or cold.

Mediterranean Climates Seeds

A Mediterranean climate typically has warm, dry summers and mild wet winters. The temperatures are much lower than a tropical monsoon climate, and show considerable variation. Some regions may see frost, but winter is typically wet, not snowy. Coastal regions may have foggy summers but typically see little rain in the summer.

These areas have hot, dry summers that are usually long. In the US there is often some summer rainfall in the form of thundershowers. In Europe these tend to be areas of high elevation with long, dry summers.

A humid subtropical climate has warm to hot and humid summers, often with thunderstorms and cool wet winters that rarely duck below freezing. For the most part, our readers with Humid Subtropical weather live in the Southeastern United States.

At the top of that list would be chemical contaminants in products such as concentrates, like the hard, amber-colored Shatter, which contains more than 90 percent THC, LaFrate suggests. Concentrates and edibles (think brownies) make up perhaps half of the current Colorado market. Their makers sometimes suggest that their chosen products are healthier than standard weed because they don’t involve frequent smoking. But some manufacturers employ potentially harmful compounds like butane to strip the plant of most everything but THC. Tests also show that marijuana plants can draw in heavy metals from the soil in which they are grown, and concentrating THC can increase the amounts of heavy metals, pesticides or other substances that end up in a product. That means regulations for their production still need to be hammered out, LaFrate says.

In Colorado, which made marijuana legal in November 2012, the latest results show that the pot lining store shelves is much more potent than the weed of 30 years ago. But the boost in power comes at a cost—modern marijuana mostly lacks the components touted as beneficial by medical marijuana advocates, and it is often contaminated with fungi, pesticides and heavy metals.

“I’ve heard a lot of complaints from medical patients because somebody claims that a product has a high level of CBD, and it turns out that it actually doesn’t,” LaFrate says. Colorado also does not yet require testing of marijuana for contaminants. Washington, the second state to legalize recreational marijuana, does require such testing for microbial agents like E. coli, salmonella and yeast mold, and officials there rejected about 13 percent of the marijuana products offered for sale in 2014.

Medical and recreational marijuana use is increasingly legal—but do consumers know what they’re smoking?

In the U.S., legal hurdles have long hampered research into marijuana. But as more states approve medical and even recreational marijuana, scientific inquiries have spiked, especially studies aimed at finding out what exactly is in today’s weed—and what it does to our bodies.

“It’s pretty startling just how dirty a lot of this stuff is,” LaFrate says. His team commonly found fungi and bacteria in the marijuana products they tested. But for now it’s unclear just how much marijuana growers need to clean up their product. “Like ourselves, this plant is living with bacteria that are essential to its survival. In terms of microbial contamination, it’s kind of hard to say what’s harmful and what’s not,” he adds. “So the questions become: What’s a safe threshold, and which contaminants do we need to be concerned about?”

“There’s a stereotype, a hippy kind of mentality, that leads people to assume that growers are using natural cultivation methods and growing organically,” says Andy LaFrate, founder of Charas Scientific, one of eight Colorado labs certified to test cannabis. “That’s not necessarily the case at all.” LaFrate presented his results this week at a meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS) in Denver.

Those thinking that stronger pot is always better pot might think again. Breeding for more powerful marijuana has led to the virtual absence of cannabidol (CBD), a compound being investigated for treatments to a range of ills, from anxiety and depression to schizophrenia, Huntington’s disease and Alzheimer’s. Much of the commercially available marijuana LaFrate’s lab tested packs very little of this particular cannabinoid. “A lot of the time it’s below the detection level of our equipment, or it’s there at a very low concentration that we just categorize as a trace amount,” he says. Consumers specifically seeking medical benefits from cannabis-derived oils or other products may have a tough time determining how much, if any, CBD they contain, because Colorado doesn’t currently require testing.