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is it illegal to import cannabis seeds into the uk

Weedseedsexpress ships to the UK and has some of the best cannabis seeds for sale!

Although there aren’t that many cannabis seeds stores in the UK you can definitely find shops that sell cannabis seeds. For example in London but also in city’s like Leicester and Newcastle. Yet most growers prefer to buy their seeds online. Especially because of the convenience, speed and discretion.

Weed seeds UK law: cannabis seeds legal or illegal?

The main reason it is and it will probably stay that way in the foreseeable future is the signing of a treaty, following the Convention on Narcotic Drugs in 1962. This important international treaty – which as such takes precedence over national law – determines that marijuana is illegal, but not its seeds. The 180 countries (including the UK) that signed the treaty, committed themselves to a definition of narcotics that does not include cannabis seeds.

If you live in the UK and are interested in cannabis seeds, it is not always clear what is within the limits of the law and what is not. You might wonder for example: is it legal to order cannabis seeds in the UK through this web shop or via cannabis seed companies like Vault, Gorilla and Attitude seed bank? The short answer to that question is: Yes. It is legal to order and own cannabis seeds in the UK. Yet there are certain points of interest. Therefore we have written this article “Cannabis seeds UK” where you can read everything you need to know before you buy cannabis seeds in the UK.

The knowledge that your purchase of cannabis seeds in this web shop is 100 percent legal is no doubt a comforting thought. Our excellent products guarantee many more such comforts. First and foremost, we pride ourselves in the quality of our products. Our cannabis seed bank promises a 93 percent germination rate and we make good on our promises. Not enough yet? We ship all our cannabis seeds to the UK with free delivery.

But in Gypsy Nirvana, unlike in Marlow or Jones, it seems that there was no evidence that the defendant had said or done anything which could be construed as positive encouragement or advice as to how the seeds should be cultivated. The evidence in the US extradition request proved only that the defendant had sold the seeds. Even the widely and elaborately drafted inchoate liability provisions of the SCA (which postdate Marlow and Jones) could not stretch wide enough to capture the conduct of which the defendant was accused. These provisions could not be used to close the deliberate lacuna in UK law that the mere selling of cannabis seeds is lawful, unlike the position under US law.

Arguably, this is a narrow and artificial application of the dual criminality rule. It is well-established that the analogue offence under UK law does not need to be on all fours with the offences alleged in the requesting state. Extradition practitioners will be aware that, in practice, the UK courts often adopt a purposive (some might say creative) approach to finding a UK offence which maps onto the conduct alleged by the requesting state.

In light of Marlow and Jones, it might be asked: doesn’t the act of selling cannabis seeds constitute sufficient incitement to cultivate them contrary to section 19 MDA or sections 44-46 SCA? What, after all, is the purpose of selling industrial quantities of cannabis seeds, often to repeat customers, if not for their cultivation? Even if the seller puts disclaimers on his website that cannabis cultivation is illegal, that is no different to the defendant in Jones who plastered his shop with such warnings to maintain a veneer of legality.

“it is not illegal to offer for sale or supply the paraphernalia associated with smoking cannabis and nor is it illegal to offer for sale or supply the equipment necessary to grow the plant, books which explain how cannabis may be grown or, indeed, cannabis seeds. As a result, there are a number of shops and other outlets which offer these goods for sale but it is obviously very important that these premises do not overstep the line and incite the commission of an offence.”

Although the common law offence of incitement was repealed in 2008, several statutory offences of incitement remain in force. These include section 19 MDA, which provides that:

To prove an offence of incitement it is not necessary to prove that anyone was in fact incited. The offence of incitement is committed when the inciting words or conduct take place. In Marlow, the book was capable of persuading someone to cultivate cannabis, and it was clearly published and sold for that purpose, regardless of whether anyone tried to implement its advice. Likewise, in Jones, the advice relayed to the undercover officer, together with the sale of the equipment, evidenced a desire to encourage the officer to cultivate cannabis.

In Gypsy Nirvana, the court’s answer to these questions was that the essential conduct alleged against the defendant in the US was trafficking, exporting and importing marijuana seeds. There were no analogue offences under UK law which mapped onto this conduct. The conduct alleged in the US was not described as a conspiracy to cultivate cannabis, nor encouraging or assisting cannabis cultivation, for which there would be analogue offences under UK law.