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is growing from seed easier than cannabis clone

Indoors you can grow both ways without many issues, but when it comes to planting outdoors we run into an issue. If you bring your clones outside they’ll have much less light than what you had accustomed them to and they’ll begin flowering. You can only bring clones outdoors to flower so you’ll have to plant early or reveg them, or take them out during the summer and allow them to flower in lots of teeny plants.

Another big difference between growing from seeds and growing from clones is the yield that you’ll obtain once harvest time rolls around. When planting clones you know that you’re going to get more or less the same yield, appearance, flavor, aroma and potency, so it’s extremely easy to get large quantities of identical bud, like 2 kilos of the same weed for example.

Clones don’t have main roots, rather than many lateral roots that act like a secondary root. These roots feed quite nicely but it’s a bit harder for them to get deeper into the substrate. This means that your clones will never have strong trunks and branches, meaning they can’t really deal with much weight. You’ll need to grow them in 12/12 right after planting them in flowerpots to flower as many as possible in as little space as possible, allowing for a decent yield. If you grow them bigger then you’ll actually end up with less of a yield. From a 600w light you can get around 350g of weed, whereas by using seeds you can get 500g in the same conditions.

Cannabis seeds grow a main root when germinated, which will grow to the bottom of the pot and then grow hundreds of secondary lateral roots out to the sides. That root will then be the plant’s main trunk, which will be thick and strong; much more so than a clone. This also makes for thicker and heavier buds than on any clone simply because of the extra weight the plant is capable of dealing with.

When planting from seeds you can save yourself the trouble involved with all of those issues, and if one of them appears such as insects at least you’ll know where it came from and that you didn’t manage to buy it from someone. If you don’t buy clones and want to make your own, you’ll need to maintain a mother plant for quite a while which isn’t that easy.

Clones are a natural reproduction process, just like seeds, and it began getting popular due to the fact that there were no feminized seeds available and if you wanted to plant indoors it was the best way to make sure they were all female plants. Nowadays you can find many strains, in fact all strains, in feminized versions, so you don’t need to plant clones anymore to be sure they’re all female.

There are so many differences between clones and seeds; if you get clones and they’re not yours or from a trustworthy source, then I wouldn’t recommend having them in your grow. Seeds are much safer for growers just looking to smoke their own stash; there’s much more variety and yield, whereas clones can be hard to come by and aren’t always safe.

Seeds are nature’s way of encouraging genetic diversity. Each seed represents a cross between a male and a female cannabis plant instead of a single plant. Seeds may be created at random, or carefully bred by growers.

Clones are cuttings from a mature marijuana plant that grow into new identical plants. They are sometimes called “starts.” Since they are exactly the same as their parent plant, they will inherit all of the features and characteristics of that plant. That means, if the parent plant had health issues, the cloned plant would also have problems from the start.

Advantages of using clones

Clones take less time because they are cut from a grown plant and already have a head start on root development. Seeds also need to germinate before going through the vegetative and flowering stage, adding weeks to their development. The fact that clones grow faster also means there is a lower yield.

There are many potential variables to consider when growing marijuana . The first is whether you will start with seeds or clones . Each option has its own set of pros and cons, and you can either fail apically or experience great success with both. Here’s what you should consider when faced with the clones vs seeds debate.

That’s why the hardest part of cloning is choosing a good “mother” plant. The best plant should be at least four weeks old, three months at most. It’s a good idea to stop any fertilization (especially any nitrogen) at least a week before obtaining your cutting; this ensures that the clones have better root development.