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is cannabis sativa seed oil legal

Its highly nutritional composition means that Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil acts as a super moisturiser that intensively nourishes and regenerates sensitive and tired skin and helps to support the skin’s natural moisture barrier. It also contains properties that soothe and calm the skin, and unlike other oils, it will not clog pores, and is suitable for most skin types.

What does Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil do for the skin?

Since Hemp is extracted from the seeds of the Cannabis Sativa plant, Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil contains is completely non-psychoactive and legal.

Hemp is a multi-purpose, multi-beneficial ingredient made from the pressed flowers, leaves, stalks and seeds of the Cannabis Sativa plant. Often cultivated for use in everything from agriculture, to food and beauty; hemp is most commonly known for its fibrous qualities and is frequently used in the production of clothing, textiles, and paper. Hemp oil and seeds also find their way into many foods as they are a rich source of omega fatty acids and essential nutrients.

Stress is often an inevitable part of everyday life and can affect the skin in many different ways, from accelerated the visible signs of ageing, to dehydration, to irritation, to dullness and uneven skin tone and texture. Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil tackles the signs of stressed skin, calming, soothing and reducing the appearance of redness . Like every other organ in the body, the skin has its essential needs for optimal health and beauty. The most important two ingredients that a skincare product can contain are essential fatty acids and vitamin E. In nature Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil contains a balanced concentration of omega 3 and omega 6.

A. Cannabis is a plant of the Cannabaceae family and contains more than eighty biologically active chemical compounds. The most commonly known compounds are delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Parts of the Cannabis sativa plant have been controlled under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) since 1970 under the drug class “Marihuana” (commonly referred to as “marijuana”) [21 U.S.C. 802(16)]. “Marihuana” is listed in Schedule I of the CSA due to its high potential for abuse, which is attributable in large part to the psychoactive effects of THC, and the absence of a currently accepted medical use of the plant in the United States.

A. The FDA is aware that several states have either passed laws that remove state restrictions on the medical use of cannabis and its derivatives or are considering doing so. It is important to conduct medical research into the safety and effectiveness of cannabis products through adequate and well-controlled clinical trials. We welcome the opportunity to talk with states who are considering support for medical research of cannabis and its derivatives, so that we can provide information on Federal and scientific standards.

Consumer Information

23. What should I do if my child eats something containing cannabis?

We are aware that state and local authorities are fielding numerous questions about the legality of CBD. There is ongoing communication with state and local officials to answer questions about requirements under the FD&C Act, to better understand the landscape at the state level, and to otherwise engage with state/local regulatory partners.

As also discussed above (see Question #5) the agency also issued a draft guidance in July 2020, Cannabis and Cannabis-Derived Compounds: Quality Considerations for Clinical Research Guidance for Industry, for individuals considering clinical research in this area.