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hemp seeds and cannabis sativa difference

Its highly nutritional composition means that Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil acts as a super moisturiser that intensively nourishes and regenerates sensitive and tired skin and helps to support the skin’s natural moisture barrier. It also contains properties that soothe and calm the skin, and unlike other oils, it will not clog pores, and is suitable for most skin types.

Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil is an herbaceous oil cold pressed from hemp seeds and has long been recognised for its use as a food and beauty ingredient. The use of Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil in skincare products has grown in popularity over the last few years as a result of an increasing consumer interest in using the power of plants in skincare formulations. This naturally green oil is composed of up to 90% omega fatty acids. Unlike CBD oil, Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil is mainly found in skincare products thanks to its powerful hydrating properties and abundant antioxidants.

Hemp is a multi-purpose, multi-beneficial ingredient made from the pressed flowers, leaves, stalks and seeds of the Cannabis Sativa plant. Often cultivated for use in everything from agriculture, to food and beauty; hemp is most commonly known for its fibrous qualities and is frequently used in the production of clothing, textiles, and paper. Hemp oil and seeds also find their way into many foods as they are a rich source of omega fatty acids and essential nutrients.

Alongside a balanced ratio of essential fatty acids, one of the omega-6 fatty acids that hemp oil contains is gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), which simultaneously encourages skin growth and cell renewal. This can help to calm irritation on the skin, while keeping the skin intensively nourished, plumped and moisturised.

Naturally moderates oil production

What is Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil?

A natural antioxidant

This confusion exists because marijuana was created by selectively breeding Indian hemp for Tetrahyrdocannabinol (THC). THC is the major differentiating factor between hemp and marijuana.

In the regulatory realm, technically anything containing (even the minutest) concentrations of tetrahyrdocannabinol (THC) are regulated under the Drug Enforcement Agency’s Controlled Substance Act; however, the federal government allows states to create their own cannabis policies.

What is the difference between hemp and marijuana?

Conversely, European growing conditions for CBD resemble fiber conditions and the crop is often dual harvested for fiber and CBD. This CBD is produced at lower concentrations in the tops of fiber varieties. This method creates a dual-purpose production system and resembles densely-packed hemp fiber production as opposed to bushy, flowering marijuana.

Just like a marijuana grower, a hemp farmer growing for high concentrations of CBD would want to remove the male plants from the field or facility before pollination. This allows for less seed and higher concentrations of phytocannabinoids in each plant. Under this growing condition, hemp grown for phytocannabinoids like CBD commonly resembles marijuana production patterns.

Hemp and marijuana are both cannabis. But, hemp and marijuana are different varieties of the Cannabis sativa species.

In this context, Regulation (EC) No. 1223/2009 for cosmetics bans the use of CBD derived from resin, tinctures and extracts of Cannabis, as well as cannabinoids, resin and various extracts (e.g. Cannabis Sativa flower extract, Cannabis Sativa flower/leaf/stem extract) from cosmetic use (Annex II). Synthetically produced CBD is acceptable for end use.

How is hemp used in cosmetics and what are its properties?
There are several types of extract from hemp used in cosmetics:

Transparency and traceability
Following baseline regulatory compliance, for the formulation and subsequent claims made about natural and organic cosmetics, transparency and traceability are key to ensure that any substance extracted or derived from hemp used in a product ensures certain verifiable qualities. When using raw materials from Cannabis in cosmetics, brands should choose reliable supply chains that give proof of the traceability of these plant extracts from crop-to-shop. This is a key aspect for regulatory compliance but also for end consumers because it reassures them about the origin and qualities of these substances when used in a cosmetic product.

What is hemp?
Hemp is a variety of Cannabis sativa L. Hemp is a dioecious plant, which means that it can be separated into male and female plants. In hemp fields, there is usually a concentration of female hemp and sporadic placed males to pollinate the females and produce nutrient-rich seeds. Hemp has been used for over 10,000 years to make paper and fibres for clothing and fabric, but also in cosmetic products, particularly as an oil but also as other extracts and derivatives.

To this date, cosmetic regulatory compliance of CBD as an ingredient itself relies on the part of the plant from which it is extracted. For instance, seeds when not accompanied by tops are acceptable, although these do not contain CBD, whereas CBD prepared from Cannabis extracts or tinctures from flower/fruiting tops where the resin has not been separated, as well as the separated resin, are not allowed for use. Indeed, the UN 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs defines controlled cannabis as “the flowering or fruiting tops of the cannabis plant”, but does not consider Cannabis sativa seeds or leaves as controlled substances (as long as they are not accompanied by the tops).

Marijuana and CBD are not the same even if they both come from the same plant. CBD is a single, isolated compound in the cannabis plant, while marijuana contains many naturally occurring compounds, including THC and CBD. Hemp seed oil, extracted from the seeds of Cannabis sativa L., Cannabaceae, has next to no THC or CBD.

Other raw materials from hemp include by-products from production of hemp seed oil such as Cannabis Sativa Seedcake powder and Cannabis Sativa Seedcake, which may be used as abrasives, as well as derivatives such as Potassium Hempseedate, which can be found in soaps and handwashes, and Ethyl Cannabis Seedate, which may be used as a naturally derived Cyclopentasiloxane (D5) substitute.