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hemp deeived cannabis seed oil

Jamestown settlers introduced hemp to colonial America in the early 1600s for rope, paper, and other fiber-based products; they even imposed fines on those who didn’t produce the crop themselves. US presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp.

Hemp products from pre-Columbian native civilizations were also found in Virginia. Vikings, who used the plant for making rope and sails, may also have brought seeds with them when they attempted to colonize the New World.

Hemp produces a broad range of cannabinoids, including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the intoxicating cannabinoid in marijuana. However, hemp does not produce enough THC to create intoxicating effects.

Frequently asked questions

Although hemp and marijuana are both classified biologically as cannabis, there are a number of important differences between them. Here we’ll break down the anatomy, history, use, and legality of the hemp plant to get to the heart of not only what distinguishes hemp from marijuana, but also what makes it such a viable, versatile commodity.

Hemp seeds are rich in protein, dietary fiber, vitamins, and minerals. They contain an optimal ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids for healthful consumption. A 2008 study also found that hemp proteins are more digestible for humans than common soy protein isolates (SPIs) used in food products. Hemp seeds can be used as food directly or via oil produced from them. Seeds can also be ground up for flour or mixed with water to create hempseed milk.

Exactly how and when hemp originated in the New World is still highly debated. Though long thought to be introduced to the Americas by Christopher Columbus, hemp has been discovered in Native American civilizations that predate Columbus’ arrival. William Henry Holmes’ “Prehistoric Textile Art of Eastern United States” report from 1896 notes hemp from Native American tribes of the Great Lakes and Mississippi Valley.

There’s the added bonus of increased bioavailability. Through the act of inhalation, your bloodstream absorbs CBD much faster than it would after eating an edible or using a tincture under your tongue. Your body will also have access to a lot more of the CBD in the smoke or vapor when it’s inhaled. When consumed, a CBD edible goes through the digestive tract, and some of the potency is lost in the process.

What is hemp?

Naturally moisturises, heals and soothes

Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil is an herbaceous oil cold pressed from hemp seeds and has long been recognised for its use as a food and beauty ingredient. The use of Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil in skincare products has grown in popularity over the last few years as a result of an increasing consumer interest in using the power of plants in skincare formulations. This naturally green oil is composed of up to 90% omega fatty acids. Unlike CBD oil, Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil is mainly found in skincare products thanks to its powerful hydrating properties and abundant antioxidants.

What does Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil do for the skin?

As a rich source of vitamin E, a powerful natural preservative and antioxidant, Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil helps strengthen the skin’s natural barrier so that valuable moisture remains locked-in and skin is protected against environmental stress factors.

It's no surprise, then, that skin-care brands are betting big on ingredients from the hemp plant. Case in point: The new Green Releaf collection from Peter Thomas Roth, which includes the Therapeutic Sleep Cream and Calming Face Oil, both of which are infused with hemp-derived cannabis sativa seed oil.

We know, the science surrounding Cannabis in all of its many forms can get confusing. Here are the basics: There are more than 80 different cannabinoid compounds that can be extracted from the cannabis sativa plant (otherwise known as weed). Of these, the two compounds that are the most well-known are CBD and THC—the latter being the one that produces a high when you eat or smoke it (a.k.a. it makes you stoned). Although Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil is derived from the hemp plant—hemp oil comes from the seeds, while CBD is derived from the leaves—it doesn't contain any CBD or THC compounds, but it is naturally rich in many skin-smoothing, calming, and moisturizing properties.

With the recent passing of the Farm Bill, which legalized the production of industrial hemp, more products will flood the market, making it more difficult to weed out the highs from the lows. And, you might be teeming with Qs: Will slathering it on give me the munchies? Is it even legal in all 50 states? What’s the best way to add hemp-oil into your skin regimen? Quick answers: No, yes, and glad you asked.

So. what is Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil?

“Hemp seed oil is oil extracted from the hemp plant,” explains Joshua Zeichner, Director of Cosmetic and Clinical Research at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. “Hemp seed oil is an outstanding natural oil for the skin,” Zeichner adds, which is precisely what makes it such a powerful skin care ingredient.