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fertilize cannabis seeds

Nutrient solution bottles and fertilizer bags will indicate how much of the three main nutrients are in the product, in the form of N-P-K: Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, For example, a product that says “10-4-4” will contain 10% available nitrogen, 4% phosphorus, and 4% potassium by weight.

Most of these fertilizers can be purchased cheaply at your local nursery and then mixed into soil before potting outdoors. Done correctly, you’ll only need to water your plants throughout the growing process, as all nutrients are in the soil.

How to use and mix cannabis nutrients

Growing high-quality weed requires more nutrients, or fertilizer, than most common crops.

Compost is filled with beneficial microorganisms and nutrients, and you can take it one step further by steeping it in aerated water. This process, called “compost tea,” extracts the microorganisms and soluble nutrients into a water “tea” solution.

Organic fertilizers and nutrients can be more forgiving than liquid nutrients. They usually contain less immediately soluble nutrients and more elements that are beneficial to soil organisms.

All the nutrients needed for cannabis plant development are naturally present in the environment. However, to help your plants develop even faster and produce a better end product, you’ll want to feed them with fertiliser—concentrated nutrients.

However, cannabis needs more than just three nutrients to survive and thrive. It also counts on secondary nutrients like calcium, magnesium, and sulfur to play vital roles in plant growth:

UNDERSTANDING CANNABIS MACRO AND MICRONUTRIENTS

Cannabis plants are sensitive to nutrients, and there’s a fine line between properly feeding your plants and burning them with chemicals. Find out everything you need to know about properly feeding cannabis plants in our guide!

There are many different brands of cannabis nutrients on the market, and they can differ considerably.

Beyond this, plants also make use of several other nutrients in small quantities (micronutrients) that are nevertheless extremely important. These include boron, chlorine, copper, iron, manganese, molybdenum, and zinc. While these aren’t the main nutrients plants use for food, they still play very important roles in various aspects of plant health.