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does cannabis sativa seed oil contain thc

Possibly the biggest thing to look out for, though, is the word “Cannabis sativa seed oil,” a tricky marketing term that capitalizes off of the CBD movement but has zero CBD at all. Cannabis sativa seed oil comes from the seed and not the plant, whereas CBD comes from the actual plant. In fact, the term “cannabis sativa seed oil” is actually just another name for hemp seed oil, which you’ve heard for years. It’s the ingredient that’s been found in crunchy, outdoorsy brands sold in-stores or at farmer’s markets, for years. While hemp seed oil has no CBD properties, it does provide you with an amazing supply of beautiful non-comedogenic oil.

This means that products ranging from Peter Thomas Roth’s Green Releaf Sleep Cream, Herbivore’s Emerald oil, Kiehl’s Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil Herbal Concentrate are as edgy as drinking coffee out of a plastic straw.

(Photo Courtesy Lime Crime)

As a single ingredient, CBD sounds magical. Studies have shown that CBD has anti-inflammatory effects and can calm down your skin as well. The oil is nourishing, has plenty of vitamins and can give you an instant, healthy glow. But there’s also so much confusion when it comes to the actual oil. So popular is cannabis, the industry now projects that the market will reach $16 billion by 2025, with beauty being a huge part of it.

But not all cannabis products are actually CBD or contain THC, the psychoactive that gets you high. Some brands that tout cannabis aren’t being so transparent and are capitalizing on this entire green movement. CBD is really confusing because marketers aren’t doing their best to provide information to consumers. Whether a product has CBD, THC or hemp oil makes a huge difference in the outcome of your beauty experience.

To understand CBD, one must understand that not all products are made equal. Hemp oil, for instance, is legal everywhere where as marijuana isn’t. To be considered hemp, a product can only have up to .3% of THC, the ingredient that gets people high. While these hemp oils have low THC, it has a high level of CBD, the ingredient that many have heralded as being an amazing anti-inflammatory ingredient. CBD is amazing for skin because it not only has said properties, it also contains essential fatty acids and vitamins A, D and E, all incredible ingredients for keeping your skin beautifully nourished.

By now, you’ve probably used a product or three with “cannabis” on the label. But did it work for you? Did you find it to be anti-inflammatory or something that lessened your anxiety? If not, it’s probably because the product you’re using has zero CBD in it at all.

Hemp is a multi-purpose, multi-beneficial ingredient made from the pressed flowers, leaves, stalks and seeds of the Cannabis Sativa plant. Often cultivated for use in everything from agriculture, to food and beauty; hemp is most commonly known for its fibrous qualities and is frequently used in the production of clothing, textiles, and paper. Hemp oil and seeds also find their way into many foods as they are a rich source of omega fatty acids and essential nutrients.

Stress is often an inevitable part of everyday life and can affect the skin in many different ways, from accelerated the visible signs of ageing, to dehydration, to irritation, to dullness and uneven skin tone and texture. Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil tackles the signs of stressed skin, calming, soothing and reducing the appearance of redness . Like every other organ in the body, the skin has its essential needs for optimal health and beauty. The most important two ingredients that a skincare product can contain are essential fatty acids and vitamin E. In nature Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil contains a balanced concentration of omega 3 and omega 6.

What is the difference between cannabis, hemp and marijuana?

Suitable for all skin types

Naturally moisturises, heals and soothes

What is the difference between hemp, CBD and marijuana?
The Cannabis plant contains over 80 biologically active chemical compounds (cannabinoids). However, the most known ones are delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). Different taxonomic classifications of the genus Cannabis vary in their THC and CBD content. For example, Cannabis indica originally from India contains a high THC content associated with marijuana hashish production, whereas Cannabis sativa L. from Europe and western Eurasia has a high CBD content, traditionally associated with the textile industry, and more recently to applications within the cosmetic, food and pharmaceutical sectors. Unlike THC, CBD has no psychoactive effects.

Other raw materials from hemp include by-products from production of hemp seed oil such as Cannabis Sativa Seedcake powder and Cannabis Sativa Seedcake, which may be used as abrasives, as well as derivatives such as Potassium Hempseedate, which can be found in soaps and handwashes, and Ethyl Cannabis Seedate, which may be used as a naturally derived Cyclopentasiloxane (D5) substitute.

Specific European and national legislation as well as international conventions apply to establish which type of extracts and derivates of the Cannabis sativa L. plant may be used in products, including food and cosmetics. Keep reading to find out more about hemp, an incresingly popular ingredient in cosmetics, and the differences in the extracts and derivates of the Cannabis sativa L. plant.

How does regulation work outside the EU?
In the USA, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not prohibit or restrict the use of cannabis or cannabis-derived ingredients in cosmetics, and considers the possibility that a product containing these substances can have both a cosmetic and a drug use (for instance, creams to treat dermatitis or acne). Unlike in the USA, however, no therapeutic or medical claim should be asserted for cosmetics in Europe. This applies as well to products containing permitted cosmetic raw materials extracted from Cannabis sativa.

To this date, cosmetic regulatory compliance of CBD as an ingredient itself relies on the part of the plant from which it is extracted. For instance, seeds when not accompanied by tops are acceptable, although these do not contain CBD, whereas CBD prepared from Cannabis extracts or tinctures from flower/fruiting tops where the resin has not been separated, as well as the separated resin, are not allowed for use. Indeed, the UN 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs defines controlled cannabis as “the flowering or fruiting tops of the cannabis plant”, but does not consider Cannabis sativa seeds or leaves as controlled substances (as long as they are not accompanied by the tops).