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cannabis vs hemp seeds cbd

For more information, read our blog post on what CBD oil is .

Yes, hemp oil can be good for pain. Hemp seed oil is applied topically or ingested by many people as a form of natural pain relief. It has anti-inflammatory properties that can be useful for people suffering from a variety of painful infections, autoimmune disorders or injuries.

Omega-3s are essential fatty acids that many experts believe aid good brain and heart health as well as boosting circulation and the immune system. Gamma linolenic acid (or GLA) is part of the omega-6 family and is known for its role in easing the symptoms of PMS and supporting the growth of healthy skin, hair and nails. Meanwhile omega-9 plays a role in promoting heart health by supporting balanced cholesterol levels and improving immune function.

How does CBD work?

There are different ways on how to use CBD oil. Most people take a few drops of CBD oil under the tongue, but it can be added to your smoothie, coffee (apparently it takes away the jitters) or applied topically to pain points.

Good Hemp’s hemp oil is super-rich in omegas (otherwise known as good fat) and has 25 times more omegas than olive oil. It has absolutely no trans fats (and 40% less saturated fats than olive oil).

The main difference between hemp oil vs CBD oil, is that hemp oil has little to no CBD content. Hemp Oil is made by cold-pressing the hemp seeds into an omega-rich culinary oil. CBD oil is made by extracting the compound CBD from the leaves, flowers and stalks of a hemp plant. However, both hemp oil and CBD oil, have their own health benefits.

The benefits of CBD oil is that it is used to treat a number of different conditions including anxiety, depression, pain and PMS, and is said to have beneficial effects on concentration, energy levels and sleep. It’s also sometimes used topically as an anti-inflammatory (but you might want to check the price before you start pouring it on your bad back – some CBD oils can cost around £140 for a small vial).

Hemp has been cultivated on a global scale for thousands of years. The oldest documented evidence of hemp cultivation is a rope, which dates back to 26,900 BCE, found in today’s Czech Republic.

Wang, Xian-Sheng, et al. “Characterization, Amino Acid Composition and in Vitro Digestibility of Hemp (Cannabis Sativa L.) Proteins.” Food Chemistry , vol. 107, no. 1, 1 Mar. 2008, pp. 11–18., doi:10.1016/j.foodchem.2007.06.064.

Hemp-derived CBD oil has skyrocketed in popularity in recent years. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

State laws

CBD oil is extracted from hemp leaves and flowers. More and more people are experimenting with CBD oil extracted from hemp plants as a wellness supplement, hence the ever-growing popularity of CBD-focused cultivation.

The 2014 Agricultural Act, more commonly known as the 2014 Farm Bill, includes section 7606, which allows for universities and state departments of agriculture to cultivate industrial hemp, as long as it is cultivated and used for research. Under the 2014 Agricultural act, state departments and universities must also be registered with their state, and defer to state laws and regulations for approval to grow hemp.

Although hemp doesn’t produce a significant amount of THC, it is capable of producing the non-intoxicating cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) in high concentrations. In fact, hemp-derived CBD is rapidly becoming one of the most popular forms of the cannabinoid on the market today.

Hemp fibers are primarily used for textiles, paper, building materials, and other industrial products. Raw materials such as hurds, or shives, are short woody fibers typically found inside the stalk. They’re used for making bedding materials, absorbents, particleboard, ceiling panels, compost, and other industrial products.

Conversely, European growing conditions for CBD resemble fiber conditions and the crop is often dual harvested for fiber and CBD. This CBD is produced at lower concentrations in the tops of fiber varieties. This method creates a dual-purpose production system and resembles densely-packed hemp fiber production as opposed to bushy, flowering marijuana.

For this reason, certain states have passed legislation for recreational and/or medical marijuana as well as the legal production of industrial hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill protects hemp production for research purposes and pilot scales within universities and State departments of agriculture. This is a federal bill.

Hemp and marijuana are both cannabis. But, hemp and marijuana are different varieties of the Cannabis sativa species.

Growing for Phytocannabinoids

This confusion exists because marijuana was created by selectively breeding Indian hemp for Tetrahyrdocannabinol (THC). THC is the major differentiating factor between hemp and marijuana.

Just like a marijuana grower, a hemp farmer growing for high concentrations of CBD would want to remove the male plants from the field or facility before pollination. This allows for less seed and higher concentrations of phytocannabinoids in each plant. Under this growing condition, hemp grown for phytocannabinoids like CBD commonly resembles marijuana production patterns.

First and foremost: Hemp is not marijuana. Marijuana is not hemp. This is one of the most important facts to KNOW AND SHARE because people are unaware that they are different. Oftentimes people believe that hemp is the male plant of marijuana. This is false.

The major similarity when growing hemp and marijuana is when growing for the cannabinoids. In hemp’s case, farmers grow for the CBD and other minor cannabinoids, but legally require less than 0.3% of the cannabinoid THC. As for marijuana, unless growing for a particular ratio of THC : CBD, growers want the highest concentrations of THC and CBD possible. Because these production schemes both desire high concentrations of cannabinoids found in the floral material; the current growing conditions are similar.