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cannabis transplanting seed to 1 gal pot

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3.) Transplant seedlings to a 1, 2 or 3-gallon pot (then to an even bigger final container if you desire)

If your cannabis plants double in height while still in the vegetative stage, you may want to consider transplanting them into an even bigger container for the best results. The final size of your cannabis plant is constrained by the pot size. If you keep your plants in small pots, they simply won’t grow as big as they would in bigger pots.

Transferring to a bigger container at this stage will prevent your seedling roots from becoming rootbound and “choking” themselves because they get all wrapped around the outside of the soil. The outside circling of the roots prevents the plant from using water and nutrients properly, so you often end up with droopy seedlings and hard-to-explain nutrient deficiencies.

So if your final (desired) plant size is…

These seedlings are begging to be transplanted to bigger pots (especially that big one on the bottom!)

Rockwool cubes and blocks are made for hydroponic growers. Start your seedling in a small cube and it couldn’t be easier to transplant later. Simply cut a cube-sized chunk out of a larger block and insert. The process can be repeated with minimal stress to plants.

The right time to transplant your seedlings is just before they outgrow their current container. With cubes, you can see roots poking out telling you it’s time to pot up. When you start with a cup or small pot, you are relying on above-ground cues. Typically, when the set or sets of true leaves of the seedling have spread out to cover the circumference of the container, it’s time. Also, vertical growth will be an obvious indicator.

WHAT’S THE BEST STARTER SUBSTRATE?

Before we go into the specifics, we need to be clear that starting in one medium and switching to another can be hazardous. Keep it simple and keep it consistent. You can’t start seedlings in soil and transplant later into a DWC bucket.

Cubes are the easiest to work with. Either cut a hole to size in a bigger block, or burrow a hole into the medium with your fingers and insert for a snug fit. Potting up takes a little more finesse. First, don’t fill your large container all the way to the top. Leave room so you can water properly later. If you pack the pot all the way to the top, water will mostly run off and not reach the roots.

The medium must be wet, not waterlogged. An effective wet-dry cycle is the goal. Remember to resist the temptation to overwater. Better to mist plants with a sprayer if you are not sure. Touch the medium to feel how dry it is and keep RH high.