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cannabis seed started growing amd has red underneath the leaf

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Root shock: Transplanting comes as a big shock to the root system. If your plants develop red or purple stems after being transplanted, a good dose of TLC should help them recover quickly.

Nutrient deficiencies cause a wide range of symptoms, including yellowing/drying new and old foliage, and discoloured stems and leaves. In particular, some of the early signs of a phosphorous deficiency include red and purple stems, followed by brown, dried out leaves. Magnesium deficiencies, on the other hand, tend to cause petioles (the stalks attaching a leaf to a stem) to turn red.

Cannabis likes slightly acidic soil (we recommend keeping it at 6.5 for best results). If your soil is either too acidic or too alkaline, your plants can lose healthy foliage and develop nutrient deficiencies as they struggle to uptake nutrients from your fertilisers. If your plants have red or purple stems and other signs of a nutrient issue, make sure to check your pH levels.

TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS

If your plants turn red or purple after a particularly cold night, pay close attention to them over the following days. If they continue to grow normally, then there’s nothing to worry about. If, however, you notice slowed growth or other signs of stress, bring up the temperature in your grow room (or consider moving your plants indoors if you’re outdoors).

Some fungi, such as Fusarium or Botrytis, can affect the colour of your plants’ stems and foliage. Fusarium affects seedlings, attacking their stems and eventually causing them to topple over or “damp off”. It can sometimes make stems appear dark brown, red, or slightly purple. Botrytis, on the other hand, affects larger plants and forms a characteristic brown line along the affected stems and branches, robbing them of nutrients and causing them to die.

Temperature or humidity issues: If the temperature or humidity levels in your grow room feel off, that may be part of your problem. Adjust temperature/humidity if you suspect they could be stressing your plant.

Getting the pH of your soil and nutrient solution right is essential for healthy plants. Unfortunately, it’s also something a lot of growers struggle with.

As it progresses, purplish discolourations begin to appear on the main part of the leaves and the leaf edges begin to turn brown and curl downwards. The leaf petioles (the small stalk attaching the leaf to the main stem) may also begin to turn a purplish colour. In the final stages, large patches of the leaves become purplish-brown and dead, while the remaining sections turn mottled yellowish-green.

Nitrogen deficiency is probably the most common deficiency reported by cannabis growers. It’s usually easy to identify and correct as soon as it becomes apparent, although it shares a basic resemblance to several other deficiencies in the early stages.

In severe cases of nitrogen deficiency, the leaves appear lighter and lighter in colour, and eventually begin to dry out and die. The larger leaves on the lower and outer parts of the plant are often the first to be affected and the first to die.

2. Phosphorus deficiency in a cannabis plant

However, a nitrogen deficiency in vegetative growth or early flower can severely impact overall yield and quality, as it affects the plant’s ability to photosynthesize energy. Nitrogen deficiency can usually be corrected by simply increasing the strength of your normal NPK-based feed, but if fine-tuning is required then nitrogen-only additives are not hard to find.

While this definitely isn’t a conclusive list, here are some common growing problems and how they may be identifiable on cannabis leaves (read the rest of this guide for more in-depth help):

Again, phosphorus deficiencies usually affect the outer, lower leaves first. Unlike nitrogen deficiency though, phosphorus deficiency at any stage is cause for concern, as the plants continue to require high levels of phosphorus throughout the flowering period.

At the other end of the spectrum, nitrogen toxicity results in leaves taking on a very dark green hue that can look almost black in extreme cases.