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CBD oil can be sourced from both hemp and marijuana. CBD derived from hemp has little to no trace of THC. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

CBD has potential as a treatment for cannabis dependence. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

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While all signs suggest that CBD is not addictive, someone who takes large amounts of CBD on a daily basis could experience side effects. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

It’s possible to avoid THC when using a CBD product but the combination of CBD and THC is known to produce an entourage effect, boosting therapeutic benefits while subduing negative side effects. For instance, in a 2010 study involving patients with cancer pain, researchers found that the combination of THC and CBD was more effective in treating the pain than the THC and placebo combination.

There’s a growing amount of research pointing out the benefits of CBD. Studies have shown that CBD provides anti-inflammatory and seizure-suppressant properties, as well as the ability to reduce social anxiety.

Dr. Cidambi explained that cannabinoid compounds like THC and CBD are chemicals that insert themselves into special receptors in the body’s cells and tissues. These receptors called CB1 and CB2 make up part of a vast network of neurotransmitters known as the endocannabinoid system (ECS), which helps regulate bodily functions including temperature, appetite and digestion, sleep, memory, mood, pain, and pleasure.

To make you feel even better, The World Health Organisation’s (WHO) Expert Committee on Drug Dependence (ECDD) recently concluded that CBD is non-addictive, has no withdrawal symptoms, and is generally well tolerated with a good safety profile. In fact, they determined that it was time to remove CBD from international drug control and that it exhibits no potential for abuse or dependence.

What is CBD?

“Most cannabinoids, including THC found in marijuana affect the CB1 (brain) and CB2 (immune system) receptors, producing a high. Although CBD is one of the cannabinoids found in marijuana, it does not deliver a high and is not addictive because it does not affect the CB1 or CB2 receptors,” explained Dr. Cidambi. Min An, a licenced pharmacist, added that “our body naturally produces CBD in the ECS to maintain balance when we encounter stress.” In short, An said, “we can’t become addicted to our own body’s naturally produced compound.”

Actually, on the contrary, several studies have reported that CBD has anti-addictive properties, which may be effective in helping individuals wean off drugs like marijuana, alcohol, cocaine, or heroin, added An. “CBD doesn’t cause dependence or tolerance and is a great holistic alternative for those trying to stay away from real addictions,” she explained.

CBD is having a big moment right now. From tinctures, to gummies, to water, to honey to chocolate — CBD is in everything! People take CBD to relieve anxiety symptoms, to help with sleep, to treat epilepsy, and to manage pain or muscle soreness, and these are the ailments and issues its marketed for. But is CBD addictive?

So can cannabis oil make you high?

Cannabis is in the headlines for its potential medical benefits after the recent confiscation of cannabis oil medication from the mother of a 12-year-old British boy with severe epilepsy. The furore that ensued is shining a light on campaigns for cannabis oils to be made legal for medical reasons, and the UK government has now announced a review into the use of medicinal cannabis. Here’s what you need to know.

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What is the aim of the UK government’s review of medical cannabis?

However, it is possible the drug is not as effective as cannabis oil containing THC, says Nutt. For example, the cannabis oil used to treat Billy Caldwell, the boy at the centre of the recent cannabis oil confiscation furore, contained cannabidiol and a low dose of THC, because cannabidiol alone did not stop all his seizures.

This is one of the big unknowns. “It is important to remember that there is currently very little scientific evidence to support cannabis oil containing both THC and cannabidiol as a treatment for epilepsy,” said the charity Epilepsy Action, in a statement issued this month.