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california cannabis seed regulations

Like the rest of the USA, California’s cannabis market suffered after the ‘reefer madness’ campaign, which turned public opinion heavily against the drug. In 1907, the state passed the Poison and Pharmacy Act, which banned the sale of many substances; six years after, cannabis was added to the list. In fact, California was actually one of the first states to ban cannabis use.

In 1972, California was the first state to attempt to legalise the drug. Their attempt failed, as two-thirds of Californian people voted against it.

legalize it nation wide the price will drop so low no one will want it.

The hippy movement

However, there are restrictions to this law. Cannabis users are not permitted to:

By the end of the 19 th century, cannabis had had something of a rebirth, thanks mostly to the Turkish, Arabic and Armenian immigrants who had settled in the area, and who consumed the drug recreationally.

The California Department of Food and Agriculture is responsible for the regulation of the industry in the state. At the time of writing, it has just finalised the rules regarding the cultivation of hemp, and the registration process for growers. In order to legally grow hemp, farmers must first register via their local County Agricultural Commission Office. There is a farming fee of around $900 per year.

All harvested cannabis (and plants) must be kept within the grower’s private residence, or in the boundaries of their property (e.g. a garden). They must be in a locked space, and must not be visible to the public. If these terms are violated, the individual may be given a $250 fine.

Generally speaking, cannabis seeds can be lawfully purchased by adults states with legal adult recreational use (like California) either at a dispensary or online intrastate (meaning not purchased from another state – even one that has also legalized the drug). The reason for this restriction is that interstate sales fall under the purview of federal law, which still considers marijuana a dangerous narcotic.

As the legal cannabis market has expanded, selling cannabis seeds has become more commonplace, especially as consumers’ tastes become more refined. Still not all cannabis seed sales are lawful.

Laws pertaining to sales of marijuana seeds or associated products vary a great deal in the U.S. and beyond, in part because there is a general lack of understanding on how they should be defined. Some consider seed sales ancillary to the cannabis market, but the reality is because these are part of the cannabis plant (or rather, its origins) these too are controlled.

Cannabis Seed Sales and California Law

Many marijuana growers pride themselves on their extensive knowledge of marijuana growth, which obviously begins with the seed. The three basic types of cannabis seeds are regular, autoflowering and female, with each containing broad subtypes, often referred to as “strains.” Many cannabis cultivators pride themselves on various elements of the strains they grow, as the effects can vary widely depending on seed properties. Certain strains are better for those seeking medicinal relief, while others are better for creating various degrees of intoxication and still others for a distinct taste. Growers are increasingly asserting intellectual property rights, something all cultivators should discuss with their cannabis business attorney.

The California Cannabis Control Board in accordance with Prop. 64 caps the maximum number of cannabis plants that can be grown by an individual at any given time at six. That assumes you’re over 21 and aren’t doing so in a community that has a local ordinance banning or further restricting such cultivation.

Buying, selling or transporting those seeds out-of-state though is where things can get dicey.

However, other countries are much more strict about what can be imported and for what purpose. Los Angeles cannabis lawyers strongly advise anyone conducting international sales of any cannabis product to consult with an attorney. Failure to do so could affect your pocketbook (if customs in another country refuses to allow your shipment to reach its final destination). However, it can also draw the attention of U.S. law enforcement agents, with the possibility of criminal charges.